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Development and application of mitigation and adaptation
strategies and measures for counteracting the global
Urban Heat Islands phenomenon
This project is implemented through
the CENTRAL EUROPE Programme
co-financed by the ERDF

Satellite Finds Highest Land Skin Temperatures on Earth

A paper from the American Meteorological Society on land surface temperature detected by satellites – a similar method as was used and presented in the UHI atlas: http://giam.zrc-sazu.si/uhi_atlas

The location of the hottest spot on Earth has undoubtedly been an interesting curiosity for centuries. Even with the advent of the instrumental temperature record around the year 1850, the location of the hottest spot on Earth has continued to be the subject of debate and controversy. In 1913, the weather station at Furnace Creek in Death Valley National Park, California, measured an air temperature of 56.7°C (134.1°F) and claimed the title of “hottest place on Earth.” Nine years later in El Azizia, Libya, an air temperature of 57.8°C (136°F) was recorded on land owned by an Italian farmer and the title of the “hottest place on Earth” moved from the United States to Libya. The 1922 air temperature measurement from El Azizia has never been surpassed.

Read the full paper:

Satellite Finds Highest Land Skin Temperatures On Earth
Satellite Finds Highest Land Skin Temperatures On Earth

Satellite Finds Highest Land Skin Temperatures on Earth.pdf

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